Critical period

Scientific evidence tells us that the influences from the environment are especially important early in life, during a restricted developmental period, during which the neural pathways are highly sensitive to the effects of external stimuli, and a veritable remodelling of the brain is possible.

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Sensory development

The sensory development of a baby is associated with the critical periods, during which the environmental stimuli makes the most impact to the child’s sensory development. Once the critical period is over, the environmental stimuli will no longer significantly make effect.

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Implicit memory

Research has shown that young children are able to implicitly recognize and use perceptual cues to enhance their performance. These indicate that young children possess implicit learning capabilities that enable them to acquire complex rule systems and intuitive knowledge.

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Right hemisphere

Research has established that during fetal, neonatal and infant development, the role of the right hemisphere is more profound. The early childhood education enables children to learn effortlessly, efficiently and creatively with the powerful gift of the right hemisphere.

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Sensory Development

From the birth to about two years old is the sensorimotor stage, during which infants learn about the world through their senses, and their synaptic connections are sculpted by sensory experience.

As beautifully described by Stanley Graven and Joy Browne in the article Sensory Development in the Fetus, Neonate, and Infant: Introduction and Overview, “with each sensory system, the initial stimulation is internal or endogenous, but at a critical or sensitive point in development, outside stimulation and experience are needed for further development. The outside stimulation of the sensory systems must occur in appropriate sequence, intensity, and form.” They emphasized the sensory environment – the exposures to and experiencing of sound, voice, touch, movement, smell, and vision, are the processes of neurosensory development, which are critical for memory, learning and long-term brain neural circuit connections, and preservation of brain plasticity for continued learning and development over the life of the individual.

The development of the visual, auditory, olfactory, and somesthetic systems of a baby is also associated with the critical periods, during which the environmental stimuli makes the most impact to the child’s sensory development. Once the critical period is over, the environmental stimuli will no longer significantly make effect, because some irreversible changes will have taken place at the synaptic level. For instance, children who are deprived of the use of one of their senses during its critical period at the start of their lives may have permanent gaps in this sense, even if they reacquire the use of it later on. In contrast, teaching a baby to read with large print, precise and coordinated information can create simultaneous contributions to both visual and auditory pathways of the baby brain, and help the baby to build a systematic and a coherent memory of knowledge base, which consequently stimulate the baby’s intelligence, understanding and creativity at an early age.