Brain learns Chinese as music

Chinese language is tonal. Unlike phonetic English language, the brain processes Chinese tones as music, not as words. The Chinese communication depends on pitch perception, as both speakers and listeners have to detect pitch changes whenever they have a conversation.

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Brain reads Chinese as images

Unlike English, the written Chinese is a system of pictographs, each originally representing an object or a concept. The brain processes the written Chinese characters as images, which brings some significant advantages to those...

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Geared up for both right and left brains

Unlike English, Mandarin Chinese speakers use both left and right brains to understand language, whereas English speakers use just left brain. This makes scientists to believe that Chinese people use more right brain than Westerners.

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English-Chinese bilingualism

Learning Chinese alongside English in early childhood enables young children develop co-ordinated English-Chinese bilingualism effortlessly. While learning Chinese and English together, children develop two parallel linguistic systems with long-term implicit memory...

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English-Chinese Bilingualism

Learning Chinese alongside English in early childhood enables young children develop co-ordinated English-Chinese bilingualism effortlessly. While learning Chinese and English together, children develop two parallel linguistic systems with long-term implicit memory, for any one word, the child has two signifiers and two signifieds. As a result, the child masters both languages effortlessly. In contrast, late bilingualism obtained after the critical period, the left brain is dominant and explicit memory is more involved, and the learning is often ended up as more effort and less results.

Since English and Chinese have completely different language systems, they activate different parts of the brain and use different brain powers in speaking, reading and writing. Learning Chinese alongside English requires a child to speak and read both English and Chinese, which results in brain switching constantly between left side and right side of the brain, and thus strengthens the neural pathways between the right intuitive brain and the left rational brain. The stronger those connections are, the more brainpower the child will generate, leading to the whole brain development.

From a different perspective, the growing importance of China on the world stage and the sheer numbers of people that speak Chinese around the world make Mandarin Chinese an economically important language. Apart from all the above-mentioned benefits one can derive from learning Chinese, parents who teach their babies Chinese alongside English, equip their babies for future global opportunities, and put them at a distinct advantage in the increasingly competitive business world with China.