Brain learns Chinese as music

Chinese language is tonal. Unlike phonetic English language, the brain processes Chinese tones as music, not as words. The Chinese communication depends on pitch perception, as both speakers and listeners have to detect pitch changes whenever they have a conversation.

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Brain reads Chinese as images

Unlike English, the written Chinese is a system of pictographs, each originally representing an object or a concept. The brain processes the written Chinese characters as images, which brings some significant advantages to those...

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Geared up for both right and left brains

Unlike English, Mandarin Chinese speakers use both left and right brains to understand language, whereas English speakers use just left brain. This makes scientists to believe that Chinese people use more right brain than Westerners.

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English-Chinese bilingualism

Learning Chinese alongside English in early childhood enables young children develop co-ordinated English-Chinese bilingualism effortlessly. While learning Chinese and English together, children develop two parallel linguistic systems with long-term implicit memory...

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Why Learn Chinese Alongside English?

Language shapes our mindset. Unlike phonetic alphabetic English language, Chinese language is tonal with pictorial written symbols, which results in distinct brain functions. Brain functioning differs not only when distinguishing between spoken Chinese and spoken English, but also when distinguishing between written Chinese and written English. The English alphabetic language, which is characteristically left brain oriented, the logographic nature of Chinese characters conduces to thinking in images which are oriented to the right brain. Learning Mandarin Chinese involves both right and left hemispheres of the brain, which collaborate together in responding to the written pictorial Chinese characters and their corresponding pronunciation and tones. More importantly, the brain learns Chinese as music and reads Chinese as image.

Thus, learning Mandarin Chinese alongside English, especially in early life, can bring maximum amount of stimulations to both the right (creative) and left (rational) sides of the brain, which results in quick, balanced whole brain development, leading to greater mental capacity.